Rabbit & Rogue Original Ballet Score (Danny Elfman)

Sony Classical

Rabbit & Rogue Original Ballet Score by Danny Elfman (2016) with the Limited Deluxe Edition (2017)

Get it:  If you want to go on a fantastical musical journey lead by Danny Elfman

Don’t get it:  If you want a typical film-styled soundtrack with the usual formula

This is a little bit of an unusual review for us as we usually stick to film and television scores.  However, with this ballet score being composed by legendary film composer Danny Elfman, we had to give it a listen.  Sure enough, it was not the wrong decision.  The best thing to say about this score is that it is unapologetically Danny Eflman.  In fact, it is a perfect blend of his style with that of the legendary classical composers that would score ballet.  That’s really what it is.  He uses such a fascinating combination of instruments to achieve a unique sound that belongs to only this score.  Yet, at the same time, anyone listening could tell that this is the essence of Mr. Elfman.  No one listening would guess that this was his first attempt at a ballet score.

With only six tracks, even though they are as long as ten minutes, you still want more.  This appeals to those of us who are Elfman fans, as well as anyone who can thoroughly enjoy a ballet score.  Beyond that, there isn’t much to say — not from a lack of comments, just that the only way to truly understand it is to give it a listen yourself (posted below).   Instead of trying to come up with some words to describe it, this is something that you yourself can get a preview of, and that would be better than anything I could say in this case where words just aren’t quite enough.

Rabbit & Rogue (Limited Deluxe Edition) is available now and includes a DVD that has, among other awesome things, and exclusive interview with Mr. Elfman.  You can purchase it here, or buy the mp3 of the score itself here.

 

 

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Spider-Man (Danny Elfman)

Spider Man Soundtrack Cover (Danny Elfman)

Spider-Man Soundtrack by Danny Elfman (2002)

Get it: If you like the usual sounds of Danny Elfman or like a stirring, mysterious twist on a classic super-hero soundtrack

Don’t get it: If you are hoping for a strong, powerful, and dynamic score such as that of Alan Silvestri’s The Avengers

Danny Elfman is no stranger to the super-hero type films as he has worked on Spy Kids, Men in Black, Hulk, Mission: Impossible, and Batman to name a few.  In 2002, a new take on the Spider-Man franchise was born with Tobey Maguire starring as Spider-Man/Peter Parker and directed by Sam Raimi.  This new film needed a new feel and got exactly that with Danny Elfman’s score.

This soundtrack is excellent and fits the film perfectly.  It is heavy, mysterious, and usually does not have a clear-cut majestic sound such as that of Alan Silvestri’s The Avengers theme.  It is very stirring music which occasionally incorporates hints of playfulness with a bit of a more modern twist.  Although not frequently, there are also hints of deep, romantic vibes in it as well.  This score pulls the listener in with a wonderful combination of intense action and gripping serenity.  There are multiple moments throughout where the listener can seem to understand a character’s reflections and emotions.  Sometimes that will be followed by an immediate break into a sudden struggle or battle.

The method Elfman uses to interweave the brass, strings, percussion, and occasional choir forms a quite intriguing sound that is none-the-less beautiful.  It is not beautiful in a “conventional” way, such as John Williams’ Sabrina score, but rather in a slightly enchanting manner.  This soundtrack contains a classic orchestral sound which has some infusions of modern music in it to bring the proper feel to the movie.  The main theme is reused throughout the entire soundtrack with little escape, so you must like it in order to fully appreciate the rest of the soundtrack.  Having said that, when the theme appears in other parts of the OST (Original Soundtrack) it usually has some variety in the methods used.  This is a classic Elfman score which is not a bad thing since it suits the film very well.  Overall, a wonderful soundtrack to listen to without the actual movie that will provide varying levels of inspiration to the listener.

Special Note: Happy Birthday to Danny Elfman today, May 29!

Click here to listen to the Main Theme

Click here to shop for the soundtrack